Damn, You Just leveled up!

Not my porkchop. But somebody’s, and its beautiful.

My wife and I were on the couch. She looked over at me with wide eyes. Something either really good or really bad was about to happen. I had no idea which one. She held me in a steady gaze. “Honey,” she said “That was the best damn pork chop you have ever made!”

Kaboom! I had made my wife an awesome pork chop! I know this might sound trivial but I take my pork chops seriously. I marinate in garlic and soy (not me but the pork) and then BBQ (yes even in winter-because it make me feel extra manly).  For some reason, these particular pork chops kicked ass more than usual. I was thrilled. I had levelled up on my pork chop cooking.

It feels great to level up. We all have sets of skills that are important to us, things we do that feel particularly good. That’s how I feel about pork chops. I seriously think I could out pork chop Gordon Ramsay. (Ok, I actually couldn’t-but it’s fun to dream).

Terry Crews. You want him on your team.

Levelling up feels great. When we know that our skill level has jumped and we’ve made significant progress we need to recognize it. That’s why I think it would be brilliant to have Terry Crews appear magically whenever we level up, tear off his shirt and yell at us “You just levelled up! Right on!”. Then he would give us a monstrous high five and disappear in a masculine mist of old spice. That would be awesome. I think this would be a great deal for Terry as well. He’d meet all kinds of cool people who had just accomplished something, and he’d get to travel. OK, we’d have to work out the whole “Magically appearing” thing (I’ve got an email in to Stephen Hawking) but after that, it would be a breeze.

Imagine: you’re going through your day and you do something awesome. Maybe you’re especially great at your job, maybe you hold your temper for another five minutes, maybe you make a great pancake. All of a sudden the air around you crackles, there is a rip in the fabric of time and space and Terry Crews appears with a 40 lb dumbbell in one hand and a protein shake in the other. He looks at you with a mixture of admiration and positive ferocity and yells “You just leveled up ! Nice looking pancake. The world needs more badasses like you.” Then he drops the dumbbell. Give you a blistering high five and disappears again. Leaving you with a ridiculously heavy weight and an improved sense of self-esteem.

Stephen Hawking-Master of time and space

That would feel awesome. While I work the details of this out and get Mr Crews and Mr Hawking on board, we can do this ourselves. When we’re great at something, acknowledge it. When you level up allow yourself to feel terrific.

 

You do a lot of good over the course of a day and the world does need more badasses like you.

Hawke out.

 

Brand Spanking New Keynote!

I am so happy to announce that my new keynote Connecting With Patients: The Final Frontier is ready! It was developed at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto and was met with rave reviews at PharmacyU in Vancouver. many thanks for everyone who helped in its development. Here is the summary below.
PatientXforum Crowd Wisdom

Connecting With Patients: The Final Frontier

Connecting With Patients: The Final Frontier is an original, interactive keynote that teaches medical professionals how to increase their level of engagement with their patients in a way that helps them have more impact, improves their level of Patient Centred Care and helps them find more fulfillment in their work.

Who is Rob to teach this?
Inspired by his experience as a cancer survivor and drawing on his work in comedy, Rob has created content for medical professionals, taught at U of T Medical School, created a workshop for the Ontario Hospital Association, and used comedy to help cancer patients and their families find courage and resources they didn’t know they had. All of this experience enriches and informs Connecting With Patients: The Final Frontier.

Rob starts with his patient story, his experiences navigating the healthcare system and the impact that great care has on the patient experience. He then demonstrates what it will do for medical professionals, on an emotional, professional and business level.

What you will Learn:
How to use the profound power of listening.
The best question a medical professional can ask.
The “recipe” for a significant patient interaction.
How to create better relationships with patients. (Demonstrated on stage and practiced in dyads.)
Confirmation that you now have the skill set to do this effectively.
Proof that you have a much more impact than you think.
On behalf of the people you serve: Thank You!

At the end of the presentation, participants will have developed clearly defined skills and know the specific steps to create more meaningful and mutually beneficial relationships with their patients.

Connecting With Patients: The Final Frontier was developed at Sunnybrook Hospital and first presented at PharmacyU in Vancouver. It was met with rave reviews by both participants and sponsors.

University Health Network Today

Trilled to be be presenting The Wellness Solution: Help Yourself Help The World at The University Health Network today. We will be rocking the house as part of a wellness conference for staff and clinicians. Often the people who are the best at looking after patients need to be reminded to look after themselves.

I’ve got a hot cup of coffee and I’m hittin’ the road.

Working Without a Script- The thrills and spills of using Improv in medicine.

U of T Med Magazine has done a great edition on humour in medicine. I was honoured to be included. To have a look at the other articles please go to UofTMedmagazine.

I’ve been an improviser for a long time, worked for The Second City in Canada and abroad, and to me there is something almost magical about improv.

When I was recovering from cancer, I noticed that when I went to improv shows, good things happened. I would laugh with friends, and then feel noticeably better for days. I had been in and around improv for years of course, but I wondered if this was having a positive effect on my ability to cope with life after cancer. Improv became a tool for me to deal with my condition.

I started making jokes and shows out of my situation and I was invited by some very generous people to teach workshops at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre for patients, and at the Faculty of Medicine for second-year students.

What could improv possibly do for physicians in training? Picture this: You’re in the centre of a windowless room and all eyes are on you. Sweat glistens on your forehead. You’re part of an intense improvisation game called Zulu, where the participants have to make up names for imaginary products on the spot. There’s no right answer and you can’t study for it. You have to get an idea and blurt it out. In other words, you have to be vulnerable.

I know you hate not having an answer the way my dog hates squirrels. I continue to point at you and wait for a response while 40 colleagues look on. I can see your intense desire to win but I wonder if you have difficulty connecting with people. Unfortunately, this lack of vulnerability reads as arrogance. And, as patients, we know it the instant we feel it.

I had an oncologist who shared this characteristic. He was technically competent but so arrogant and distant that he literally dismissed me from his office because he had a dinner reservation at Centro that evening. He wasn’t a bad physician, he had just forgotten how to be a human being. In that moment I felt a desperate sense of isolation. Later, I realized that the worst part about being sick for me was not feeling pain or discomfort, but experiencing isolation and fear.

That’s how I got the idea to bring improv into medicine: It came from my intense desire to increase the sense of connection between people in health care.

I’ve seen improv comedy in medicine do incredible things. I’ve seen it open up a room of physicians, patients and their care givers so that they can actually talk to each other in a meaningful way. I’ve seen cancer patients in real trouble somehow laugh at their situation and then share resources they didn’t know they had. I’ve watched as med students realize that they can relax a bit with patients; that they can (dare I say it?) be a human being with the people they serve.

Many times the laughter itself is enough to help us. Heck, who can argue with something that has been proven to increase serotonin and dopamine levels? Often though, it’s the good stuff that comes afterwards that has the real payoff. After people laugh, the natural release of oxytocin that occurs helps people bond together in an almost tribal way. They are more prone to trust each other and be generous to each other. What does this mean in medicine? It means that by using improv comedy to sneak by the sometimes brittle facade of our intellects, we find a way to our silliness, our vulnerability and our humanity. It creates a safer space for us to collaborate in a meaningful way.

To simply say that “laughter is the best medicine” is a platitude that floats by too quickly. These simple things called laughter and improv comedy can be the doorway to feeling better. There is profound good here that we can use to great effect and we have just scratched the surface.

That was a real person in my improv class, by the way — a terrified second-year medical student. I stayed silent and the group didn’t even breathe. There was no way out for him but to say something, anything. The question swirled in his brain: “What is the name of a car that should be invented?” He looked at me. I saw the light of an idea flash in his terrified eyes. “The Fartinater!” he cried.

The class roared with laughter. I applauded and declared him the winner. His face lit up like a 10-year old who has just had the best birthday ever. He was connected, with himself and those around him. Any sense of arrogance was demolished in the joy of experiencing a huge laugh from his peers. I saw a crack in the protective facade he presented to the world and I hoped that would translate to his work with patients in the future. ■

Developing Original Content for Pharmacy U

I am thrilled to have been commissioned to create an original module for Pharmacy U in both Vancouver and Toronto this year. Connecting with Patients: The Final Frontier will get its debut in Vancouver on November 25th. This session has been allotted a C.E.U (Continuing Education Unit) of .50.

This has nothing at all to do with Star Trek.

Sunnybrook Hospital Clinical Pharmacology Rounds this Thursday!

I am thrilled to be presenting  at Sunnybrook Health Science Centre Clinical Pharmacology Rounds October 19th. At noon on Thursday I’ll be doing a full hour of The Wellness Solution Help Yourself help The World.

Transition Rituals: 6 Ways To Help You Chase Away That Creepy Clown

Have you ever had a hard time leaving work at work? Have you ever given all the emotional juice you have to your job and you finally get home only to have work thoughts creep back into your consciousness? It can be a lot like dealing with that creepy clown with the red balloon from IT. You’re having a nice supper with your family and you go to the fridge and the creepy clown is sitting next to the broccoli ready to hand you a red balloon full of troubling thoughts about work. You load things in the dish washer and there he is again with another balloon you don’t need.

Later when you go for a walk, you leave the house and right next to the mailbox you see the creepy clown again. All of a sudden your thoughts go back to your day and all its unfinished business. You try like crazy to ignore the clown but he keeps coming back again and again. How do we fix this? How do we separate our challenging work from our precious time at home? Is there some magic technique to help us shut off the endless stream of work related thoughts that can pollute our time off?

I was running my workshop The Wellness Solution: Help Yourself Help The World for a group of caring professions and we were collaborating on ways of helping ourselves deal with stress and burnout. I asked “What specific challenges do you face?” The stakes were high for these highly skilled pros. They work in a beautiful but isolated community, their caseloads are heavy and burnout was starting to take its toll.

Somebody said “I have a hard time leaving work at work! I take all of these worries about my clients home with me!” I asked the group if this was a common problem and there were nods all around.

The room came alive and we immediately collaborated on solutions. One person said “After

a tough day I gather up all the files I’ve worked on, stick them in my filing cabinet and lock them up.” Somebody else offered, “I drive home by the lake and let myself think about work until I get to the end of the road and then I’m done!”

Somebody else said “I go for a really fast walk and when I get to a certain point, I act like I’m dropping all of my work troubles out on the road.” Another one was “I put all my papers away and then say goodbye to my plants, turn off the lights and I’m done!” What useful tool had we stumbled upon? Transition rituals! Transition rituals provide a definite end to our day and let us know that it’s OK to leave our concerns behind.  We are creatures of habit after all and our brains like nothing better than following a pattern. So by using our transition ritual on a regular basis we get better at it. Our psyches embrace the idea that we have ended one part of our day and begun another. By using this technique and doing something after work as simple as going for a walk or driving down a certain road; we are literally training our brains to relax and to switch gears from one way of being to another. This can help us leave work at work so we can reduce our stress and chase away that evil creepy clown.

Here are some transition rituals that we came up with that day.

1: Go for a brisk walk after work.

2: Go to the gym and do a brief workout.

3: Have a specific way of leaving the office “Turnout the lights and say goodbye to the plants”

4: Say out loud, “I’m done playing in this sandbox. This can all wait until tomorrow”.

5: Say out loud “This is yours, not mine.”

6: Take a specific route home, allow yourself to think about work until you get to a certain point, then stop.

We all know that being in the caring professions takes a lot of skill, empathy and emotional juice. All of that giving can wear out our bodies and psyches. Transition rituals can be a useful tool to help keep the creepy clown away so we can recharge our batteries and give ourselves a chance to serve not just our clients but ourselves as well.