Compassion Fatigue and AC/DC?

At a recent event for The Canadian Mental Health Association Waterloo Wellington Dufferin, I was thrilled to present The Wellness Solution: Help Yourself Help The World. During one of the breaks, I was lucky enough to meet Laura McShane and we got talking about compassion fatigue. She agreed to a brief interview for this blog. But what does any of this have to do with AC/DC?

acdc

Rob: So, we’ve talked about compassion fatigue and I’m wondering could you just tell me at a very basic level what it is?

Laura: Yes, compassion fatigue is the cost of caring. It impacts the caring part of us that brought us into the helping field.

R: Is it just Mental Health Professionals who suffer from compassion fatigue?

L: Gosh, No. Everyone in the caring professions can be affected. Nurses, physicians, first responders and therapists can all be impacted by compassion fatigue. It goes beyond professions too. Parents looking after a sick child or caregivers of family member can be affected as well.

R: I read in some of my research that people who are affected by compassion fatigue sometimes take on the feelings of the people they are helping.

L: Caring professionals can be impacted by listening to the traumatic experiences and details of a client’s life and it can be very distressing for them.

R: Is there stigma in talking about it?

L: Well, I don’t know if I would call it stigma, but I would say that sometimes it might be difficult to address it because of a worry people might think that they aren’t capable of doing their jobs, which isn’t true. Compassion Fatigue affects the most caring, hard working people.

R: How did you learn about this and then become a trainer?

L: Well, I took a terrific workshop called Walking The Walk” by Francoise Mathieu, which was really amazing. (link here) she has done some great work on compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma .  The management team of CMHA WWD believe it is important to acknowledge that it exists and help provide staff with some strategies to cope with the impact.

R: What is one of the ways to deal with compassion fatigue?

L: Having a transition ritual is a great way to help cope. A transition ritual helps you make a separation between your work life and your home life.

R: How does that work?

L: Well, when you’re done for the day and you’re going home, you might want to crank AC/DC on your car stereo and sing sing sing!!!  

R: That’s hilarious! And that’s a transition ritual?

L: Yes, it can help us draw the line between these two worlds so we don’t take the concerns of our work home with us.

R: What are some others?

L: Well, some others might be allowing ourselves to think about work up until a certain point in our drive home, say up until a marker on our drive, like a Tim Hortons. And then after that spot, we only think about our personal life and we leave work behind.

R: Any other ones?

L: Sure! A really great way of transitioning from work to home is to get out of our work clothes immediately after we get home and then getting into a more comfortable outfit. It can really help us change our mindset.compassion-word

R: Do you have any stories from your own experience about dealing with compassion fatigue?

L: Yes I do. It was earlier in my career and I came home from work one day and I had a really rough day. There had been endless appointments and I had helped people all day long. I was exhausted. When I walked in the door, my daughter was so excited to see me and she wanted to go outside and play, bike ride, catch frogs, colour, and do all kinds of things. I said “Oh honey, Mummy is really tired right now, can I just have five minutes of quiet please because I have been helping people all day.” She looked at me and said “But Mummy, you’re my Mummy.”

R: Wow!

L: And at that point I knew I had to make some changes.

R: Sometimes kids can have such clarity.

L: (laughs) Oh yes.

R: Is compassion fatigue something that we ever solve? Or is it something we have to deal with continually?

L: Well, I suppose it’s different for everyone. But, I don’t think we’re ever done. It’s part of the price of being a caring professional. One thing that a lot of people don’t realize is that this builds up over time and has a cumulative effect. So, you can be in one job and then take another position somewhere else and your level of compassion fatigue might become more and more intense. Just because we have changed jobs doesn’t mean that we have solved the issue. It’s really important for us to keep looking after ourselves and making sure that we are making our self care a priority.  That way, we can continue to do the work that we love and finish our day experiencing compassion satisfaction.

R: Thank so much for talking to me about this today! I really appreciate it.

L: You’re welcome! Thanks Rob.

R: To celebrate the awesomeness of this interview, let’s all crank “You Shook Me All Night Long” By Angus and the boys.

Article in The Star-Healing And The Arts

I am thrilled to be included in an article in The Toronto Star on Healing and The Arts. There are so many people doing really important, groundbreaking work in this field. An excerpt is below. By Joseph Hall-Toronto Star

Humour out of darkness

Toronto author, actor and comedian Robert Hawke is marshalling humour in the battle against cancer, after it helped him through his own bout with the disease.

Toronto comedian Robert Hawke helps cancer patients out of the “4 a.m. darkness” with his “Spoonful of Laughter” workshop.

His comedy career was riding a high-speed laugh track a decade ago, having brought him frequent appearances on CBC television and radio shows and a full-time gig with the Second City comedy troupe. “I was freelancing, things were good,” he recalls. “And I was leading what I considered to be a pretty healthy life.” But then cancer sent him off the rails.

Hawke learned he had a thyroid tumour and that the master metabolism gland would have to be removed. The diagnosis and treatment proved psychological blows as much as physical ones. During weeks of fretful recovery, however, he hit upon this “funny idea” — to combat his cancer with comedy. The material he started developing and writing then would build a new calling and career.

“Once I started doing (comedy) work that addressed the cancer experience, I realized there was a real need for it,” says Hawke, now 50. That need found its source in the deep wells of fear, despair and isolation into which cancer patients often fall. Using his comic skills to make cancer patients laugh, he thought, could help haul them out of that “4 a.m.” darkness and allow them to more readily share their experiences and insights about their battles with others in similar straits.

Comedian and cancer survivor Rob Hawke, in blue striped shirt, leads an improv class of cancer patients at Gilda's Club to encourage group laughter.

CHRIS SO/ Toronto Star

Comedian and cancer survivor Rob Hawke, in blue striped shirt, leads an improv class of cancer patients at Gilda’s Club to encourage group laughter.

Hawke has developed several programs to address different audiences. For cancer patients themselves, his “Spoonful of Laughter” routine is a 40-minute exercise that leans heavily on teaching improv techniques in groups large and small. Another, called “NormVsCancer,” is an irreverent one-man show that OpenLab helped him bring into hospitals and other medical settings. He also created a program — Adventures in Patient-Centred Care — that teaches second-year University of Toronto medical students how to interact with more humour and humanity in the clinic.

Hawke believes that shared laughter is a key to opening cancer patients up to the camaraderie, comfort and expert advice — the “wisdom in the room” — that can be found in fellow patients. And the reactions of patients involved in one of his recent improv exercises seemed to bear him out.

“I don’t think we get enough opportunities to laugh,” said participant Nadha Hassen, 26, who is battling thyroid cancer. “It’s amazing to … be in a space with other (patients). I feel like I just took this amazing stretch.”

Hawke also published a how-to book in 2011, called Kicking Cancer’s Ass: A Light-Hearted Guide to the Fight of Your Life. It offers cancer patients strategies on dealing with doctors, setting up support groups, making healthier choices and overcoming the bouts of worry and depression the disease can bring.

The full article is here.

Many thanks to The Star, Joseph Hall, Gilda’s Club Toronto and UHNOpenlab

Compassion Fatigue: Duking it out with the Elephant in the Room

You’re in a caring profession. You care.

However, sometimes our “muscles” of compassion and empathy can get tired. You might be easily distracted when you’re with the people you serve. You might not care as much or be using your skills to the best of your ability.

It can be hard for us to admit that this is  happening to us. We’d rather just push through it and pretend it isn’t there.

elephant-in-the-room

Then kablam! You realize “I’m suffering from compassion fatigue!”

It can feel like everyone is dealing with this better than we are. I’ll tell you a secret about humanity though, we all have our issues. Even the well adjusted “superstar” of your team can have a hard time with compassion fatigue.

So, how do we help ourselves through this? One of the great ways is to collaborate with our peers.

Wait. What?

Really. Collaborating with our peers can help us like crazy.

It struck me that that there are literally thousands in the caring professions who are working really hard, giving generously of themselves and sometimes feeling really worn out in body and psyche because of the nature of this demanding work. I am guessing that no one in the world has this whole thing solved. Yep. No one. However, if we have one small piece of the puzzle worked out, shouldn’t we share what we have?

I had the honour recently of presenting my keynote “The Wellness Solution: Help Yourself Help The World” for The Canadian Mental Health Association: Waterloo Wellington Dufferin. I asked people to share how they dealt with this when they were having a tough day.

What happened my friends, was significant.

People stood up, talked and joked.  They shared solutions and strategies to help each other with this tough issue and the energy of the room took off. As a speaker, it was so much fun to see more than a hundred people dive in and collaborate. In fact, folks were so pumped about helping each there that I had trouble ending the exercise and getting on with the show. It was a real testament to how generous people in the caring professions are and how, when we share what we have, everybody wins.

When the day ended, people were happier knowing that they helped their colleagues and that they had learned some valuable tools they could use the next time the elephant tried to sneak back in the room.

 

What the heck is wellness and why should we care?

If you’re in one of the caring professions, you probably care a lot. I bet you wake up in the morning and care more before 9 am than most people do all day. (My apologies to the marines- for a bunch of reasons.)

Having that much concern all day long can sure take its toll on your health and you guessed it, your wellness!  Well what is wellness about? Its about actually taking your own needs into account, slowing down on occasion and being kind to yourself.  Let’s use the concept of a well, because heck its right in the word “wellness”. If you are caring for people all the time and not looking after yourself, then chances are you are drawing on your own resources to help them, while depleting yourself. This can leave your poor well empty and even a bit dry, as it were.

“The Wellness Well” You see what I did there? Sure you do.

When we ignore our own wellness, we tend to stress out, feel really overwhelmed and our health can suffer. The problem is, we rarely give ourselves permission to help ourselves. We feel like we should just “tough it out” and “carry on”.

However, if a friend came up to you and said “Hey I’m burned out at work, and my joints are achy do you think I should go for a massage?” Of course you’d say Yes! You’d send them off to get their body kneaded faster than you can say “CranioSacral”-which I can’t say at all.

But will we get a massage ourselves? Of course not! Why? I blame my protestant upbringing. (Feel free to blame whatever culture you’re from- I’ve found it so much easier than actually taking responsibility for myself). But seriously, we do that all the time. We can be having a really tough time and desperately need to cut ourselves some slack but we sometimes find that difficult.

Essentially wellness is, taking care of ourselves before things become horrible. We often mislabel healthy concern and care for ourselves as “Selfishness” or “self-centered-ness” or even “being like crazy Uncle Bob” but really carving out a place for wellness in our lives can be the best thing we can do for our level of contribution. Think about it, when we feel good, do we want to contribute more or less? More of course!  Are we worse at our jobs or better? Better!

massage

Damn! Don’t you want some of this? A massage I mean.

So there you go. Wellness is valuable not just to you but to the people around you and the work you do. So how do you get more of this thing called Wellness into your life? Well, that’s not actually that hard. Here are a few suggestions:

1: You could, go for a walk in nature. Simply stepping outside and walking for thirty minute has been proven to make us healthier and reduce stress

2: Get a massage! Get rid of those aches and pains and get the blood flowing by getting a massage that is either Deep Swedish or Shallow Ukrainian, (this doesn’t exist but it should.)

3: Hug three people. Because heck, hugs feel great!

So, wherever you are and whatever you are doing, I hope you give yourself two shots of wellness today.

BTW, I am currently creating a wellness program for CMHA Waterloo Wellington Dufferin called…drum roll please…

The Wellness Solution: Help Yourself Help The World

More on this soon!

Are you tough enough to give this “frightening” gift of happiness.

This simple exercise is scientifically proven to make you happier but it’s scary.

In fact, it makes me so nervous, that I’m trying to get the courage to do it.

Here’s the deal. You think of someone in your life who has really helped you out. Someone who you are really grateful to for everything they have done. This could be a really good friend, teacher, parent or sibling. Once you have them in mind, you write a page or so thanking them for everything they have done for you.

So far so good right? Here’s the catch. Instead of sending it off by email or snail mail, you call them up and then read them the letter.

I’m not gonna lie, I’m nervous about this. The prospect of calling up my Mom and Dad and thanking them and then having a conversation with a good friend of mine and actually being honest instead of making dirty jokes is something I could easily put off until, well, forever (or at least until the next Game Of Thrones book comes out, whichever comes first.). However, I committed to doing this. I’ve written the letters and read them a couple of times out loud and its go time! Right after lunch.Game-of-Thrones-metal

Because who wants to do something like this on an empty stomach? Not me! And besides, I am prone to displays of emotion so the conversations are probably going to end with me blubbering like someone watching the end of “Love Actually”. Perfect! (He said, wishing there was a sarcasm font). BTW, this is all research for my upcoming book Doing Happiness: Uncovering the Hidden Benefits of Feeling Good.

Alright, so I’ve eaten left over chicken and prepared myself to not tear up by watching Youtube clips of Clint Eastwood in The Good, The Bad and The Ugly, so I think I’m ready.Clint Gif

Here goes.

OK, So, I got through the first one! I called up my best friend and read him my note of thanks. It was very weird and remarkably honest. I thought it would be awkward but it was actually alright. He was quite taken aback it seems, cause really, a friend rarely calls you up, swears at you and then says you’re awesome.

Now, on to my parents… After finding every excuse in the book NOT to do this, I finally went for it.cliff

Alright! That went pretty well! The world did not end and nobody cried. (This is actually a great way to measure if a day has been a success) I managed to read my note to Mom and Dad and everything was alright. I do feel really good right now. In fact, I feel downright happy. It also feels like I’ve given a gift to people who I really care about. That actually might be the most important part about this. I know it’s an exercise to increase your level of happiness, but it feels different than that. It feels like this altruistic gift of acknowledgement and appreciation.

If you want to use this technique to scientifically improve your level of happiness (and those you care about) here are the steps…

1: Decide who you want to thank.

2: Set a timer for about 20 mins and write them a letter about how thankful you are for everything they have done for you.

3: Promise yourself that you’ll get to it tomorrow.

4: When tomorrow arrives, decide it’s not the right time and then do your laundry or wash your dishes, or do your taxes from 3 years ago.

5: Finally get the courage to pick up the phone.

6: Say something like “Could you do me a favour? All you have to do is listen, I’ve written you a letter and I want to read it to you. Don’t worry, it’s all good stuff, is that ok?”

7: Read the letter.

8: Feel Awesome!

You’ll probably feel terrific afterwards, and as a bonus, the folks you care about will feel great as well. This is definitely a scary and generous gift to give and as a bonus, I bet you also get your laundry done.

Happy Post Holidays Everyone!

(Photo by Jenn Pierce/The Press)

Hawke out.

Has anxiety ever made a sneak attack on you?

So, have you ever been smacked upside the head with an unexplained dose of anxiety? It sucks doesn’t it? Well recently, I was going along and minding my own business when I was hit with a wack of anxiety. It was very strange! Ordinarily I can cruise through pretty much anything and feel calm and cool. Going onstage? No sweat! Big meeting? I got that. Final Episode of Game of Thrones? Ok, that can freak me out a bit. But really, most of the time, the word anxiety has little meaning other than something that “other people” experience.anxiety charlie brown

Not so the other day. I woke up and for some reason and I couldn’t get started working. Everytime I was about to start my timer to do the “gazillion” things I had to do, I was totally freaked out by them. So, I relaxed for a bit and then tried again. No go. I just felt more and more tension in my chest and started to feel down right “freaky”. It was like an ocean tide of bad feeling had just rolled in and there was nothing I could do about it.

Before I knew it, most of the day was gone. The next day? Pretty much the same deal. I started to feel pretty terrible and had no idea how to change my mental state. So what gives?

A few months ago I found out that anxiety runs in my family. This should have not come as a total surprise as I had heard some family members described as “worriers”, but then I realized that these stories actually went back generations. (Here’s a hint: If you hear stories about your family being worried before the Model T was invented, it might be a family issue)model t

Ah! It seems this whole anxiety thing may have deeper roots than I thought. It doesn’t seem fair that genetics, that mysterious part of our make-up that brought us our eye colour, height and our love/hate of Star Wars, would have something to do with how we feel on a regular basis, but it does. Apparently our genetic history can really affect how we feel.

Here’s the other side of the coin. Many years ago a relative who I won’t mention (We’ll just call him “Dad”) was feeling really worried. In fact, he was walking around the house anxious a lot of the time. Finally it got to the point where he needed to go to his doctor. After examining him, taking his blood pressure and asking him some questions, the doctor came up with a pretty terrific prescription. 1: Stop watching the News. 2: Wear looser underwear.

So, he went home and did both of those things-and he felt better. For me it wasn’t so simple. However, I woke up one morning and the crazy tension in my chest had lessened. I was able to work again, and as I got a bunch of stuff done, I started to feel capable and OK.

Many of us deal with this. My own small foray into the world of unnamed anxiety was tiny in comparison to what others deal with. For some, waiting a few days and making different underwear choice doesn’t cut it. Folks sometimes need medical care for their condition. If you are dealing with this or something like it, I really hope you get some assistance.

My few days of discomfort was enough for me, thank you very much. Hope it doesn’t happen again, but if it does, at least I know there are others fighting the same fight and just waiting for the tide to go out.beautiful-beaches-0

Here are a couple of resources for dealing with anxiety here.

Help Guide.org

Anxiety and Depression Association Of America

 

Is Your Happiness Selfish?

Have you ever been told that your happiness was selfish? I bet you have. “They” say concern for our own well being is something that should really be at the bottom of our list in terms of priorities or that we are being greedy or petty when we take our own happiness into account. The truth is that when we make our happiness a priority good things happen for us and for those around us. In fact, the contagiousness of feeling good virtually guarantees that if we are happy, we are making the world a better place for those we love the most.hands with globe

By the way, when I am talking about making your own happiness a priority, I am not talking about thinking only of your own needs. Please don’t say to yourself “OK, Rob says my happiness is important, so I’m going to stuff my face full of poutine, buy a red convertible on credit and move to Antigua with a bunch of bathing suit models because that will make me happy!”

zeppelin

I am crazy about these guys. Have you heard “The Rain Song”? Wow.

I’m not talking about living like we’re Led Zeppelin in 1976, or Russel Brand in 2002, I’m talking about making our daily happiness something that we care about and take into consideration.

Believe it or not, this takes discipline. It is attained not so much by going after our every sensory based desire (although, I’m all for sensory based desires) but by doing simple activities that have been proven to make us feel good, right now and in the long term as well.

“Happiness is contagious” is said so often that its a bit of a cliche, but did you know that its actually, quantifiably true?  A little out fit called The Harvard Medical School (you may have heard of them) did a study called “Dynamic spread of happiness in a large social network: longitudinal analysis over 20 years in the Framingham Heart Study” (which is really such a catchy title that it should be a pop song by Katy Perry).

“Hey Everybody, I hope you like my new hit Dynamic spread of happiness in a large social network ! Woo hoo!

In this study they found that if you were a friend of someone and lived within 1 mile of them your chance of being happy went up by 25%! Wow! If we can extrapolate (and heck why not?) that would mean that by being happy ourselves, we are actually increasing the chances of our friends and family who live close to us by 25%. Really, you are doing the world a huge chunk of good if you are happy. Isn’t that great? I think it is. So, to answer our first question, Is your happiness selfish? Nope! In fact, you being happy is one of the most generous things you can do for the world.

Hawke out.

 

Why bother being happy?

What kind of ridiculous question is that? Isn’t “being happy” supposed to be the holy grail of human experience? We each go through our lives trying to achieve things we have determined will finally help us “be happy”. This can include making more money, getting that promotion, being thinner, winning that award, getting that degree, looking like Brad Pitt, and a plethora of other goals with the hopeful result that, if we just get that thing, then we will be finally, blissfully happy.

Pitt

This is a picture of Brad Pitt

Do you want to know something terrific? You don’t need to reach all of your goals to “be happier” now. Right now, as you are reading this, you can “do happiness”.

“Doing Happiness”? But how?

What is your posture while you are reading this? If you are slouched down on your couch and kind of hunched over in a funky way, then chances are you’re not going to be feeling as good as you could be. If you are sitting (or standing) upright, with a straight back and breathing deeply then you are more likely to feel good. Go ahead and try it. If you are slouched, shift your posture so that your back is straight. Now put a big smile on your face. It doesn’t even matter if it’s a fake smile. Just paste a big goofy grin on your face. Studies have shown (and you’ll get the skinny on that later) that by shifting your posture and physically smiling you can have a direct and measurable effect on your present level of happiness and mood. See that? You just “did happiness” and this is just the tiniest tip of the iceberg. This is what this book is about- teaching simple strategies to incorporate “doing happiness” into our daily lives.

But Isn’t Happiness Over-rated?

I don’t think so, and I hope to prove it to you as you read on. There are many who believe that happiness is not enough of a benefit or a satisfactory goal. Sure there is wonderful research that doing simple things every day will make us feel better, regardless of our present circumstances, but so what?

chicken

And does it matter?

What are all the things that happiness does for us?

What happiness does for us.

The evidence has shown that “being happy” in and of itself, brings great improvement to almost all areas of our lives. This is where things get interesting.

When we feel happy, good things tend to happen more often and more consistently. In fact, many studies have shown that when we feel happy, we become:

-more productive,
-more creative,
-better at our jobs,
– we have better relationships,
-we are far healthier (we even live longer if we’re happier),
-we are perceived as more attractive,
-we tend to make more money,

That’s a pretty impressive list, don’t you think?

So, is being happy the end in itself? Or is happiness the way we get all of these terrific benefits? It doesn’t actually matter, because once we are happy, we get all this great stuff, which will then, help us be happier. You see how that works? It’s a virtuous cycle. Who cares if the chicken or the egg came first when we can have both?

 

How I feel when coffee is ready.

The idea of “doing happiness” can run contrary to a lot of our established societal beliefs. We are often taught that we need to “earn” our happiness. That satisfaction and joy must only come after tremendous amounts of hard work and sacrifice. I mean, you can’t just go around “doing happiness”, you must earn it so you deserve it. This just isn’t true. However, if hard work and sacrifice are your thing, that is completely fine, but please know that feeling good, while you are working hard and sacrificing, will help you be more productive, so that you can accomplish what you want in an easier and more effective way.

Can we uncover the secrets of not only being happy but also the many benefits that happiness brings us to give us a richer and healthier life? You bet!

This blog is an excerpt from my upcoming book Doing Happiness: Uncovering The Hidden Benefits of Feeling Good.

Watch this space for more! Have a  great day.

Rob

Do you appreciate the awesomeness of this pumpkin carving? Well, congrats…

pumpkin-carving-art-4

…You just helped make your brain healthier!

What?

Are you crazy about art? I mean any kind of art. Do you get down to old Led Zeppelin tunes? Do you do needle point? Square dance? Do water colours? Woodburning? Do you paint amateurish acrylics of your dog doing water sports? Do you make needle point pillows of Harley Davidson motorcycles jumping through rings of fire? Well if you are doing any kind of art at all, or appreciating it (like our breathtaking jack o lantern up there) you are doing yourself a world of good.

It turns out, the arts are good for us. In a very big way.

I had the pleasure recently of speaking at a conference called The Art Heals Health, Health Heals Art Symposium in Toronto. There was a very impressive group of people there who are committed to exploring how the arts help all of us be healthier. There was a neurologist there named Dr Luis Fornazzari who showed us incredible research (with diagrams of the brain that were lit up like Vegas on New Years)

 

Las-Vegas-New-Years

This is what Vegas looks like at New Years

proving that when we either do or appreciate art in any form we are stimulating neural pathways and helping our brains stay healthy (I am assuming you only have one brain- I mean brains like “all of our brains”) It turns out that our brains really need to be exercised and stimulated on a regular basis to make sure our minds stay limber.

In my own research for my upcoming book Doing Happiness: Uncovering The Hidden Benefits of Feeling Good, I came across research that shows that art does other great stuff for us as well. Art helps make us happy! Yes, that’s right. As well as keeping our brains cooking, doing any kind of art (including Norwegian woodworking) can help us to be happier in a measurable way.

Want to know the best part? You do not have to be good at whatever you’re doing to get the benefits. That’s right. You can absolutely suck at your art and you’ll still get all the benefits to your health and level of happiness.

Don’t know what art to do? Here are a few suggestions…

1: Buy some acrylic paints (they’re cheap!) and paint a landscape. There are some GREAT lessons on youtube for every level of skill, and that’s a trip to ART CITY. I mean who doesn’t love  Bob Ross?paints

 

2: Make a playlist with your most favourite music on it and go for a walk. It’s a great way to transport yourself to whole different way of thinking. forest walk

3: Dance like your choreographer is Gary Busey. (Wouldn’t that be interesting?)Gary Busey

4: Go to your local art Gallery and wander around. (If you want to sound impressive, mutter things like “How very didactically expressionistic!” even when ordering a coffee.) Personally, I am crazy about the AGO for a bunch of reasons.

aberdeen-art-gallery

 

Remember, you don’t actually have to make art, you can just appreciate it. Now we know that art is good for us and helps keep us smart, happy and gives us a shiny coat we can take advantage of it whenever we want, and remember you’re not wrecking the living room by painting a mural of your favourite Swedish Death Metal Band on the wall, your making art and staying healthy!

Rock on! Make Art!